Tips & Tricks

About This Page (More To Come!)

6/15/2020

I'm Paul Dillow, owner of Houston Computer Solutions and writer of the articles on this page.

I just created this page so there are only a few posts but I plan to add content regularly so check back.

I hope you find some useful information below.

Thanks for stopping in!

One Small Tip For Printer Jams

6/25/2020

I learned this trick years ago while working in the copy center of a law firm.

Before loading paper into your printer, "fan" the stack of paper on the edge that will face into the printer (the edge that will "grabbed" first by the printer). I've found it reduces "double-sheet feeds" and paper jams.

Phishing (Scam) Emails

6/22/2020

Recently, an email appeared in my inbox. At first glance, it looked like a perfectly valid message from PayPal informing me that my account had been "restricted."

A link was included with instructions to "provide documents that confirm your identity."

It was a phishing message.

What Is Phishing?

The Webster's definition of phishing pretty much nails it: a scam by which an internet user is duped (as by a deceptive e-mail message) into revealing personal or confidential information which the scammer can use illicitly.

The sender of this message was hoping I would go to their site and give them information about my identity.

Spotting A Phishing Message

Here's how I knew this message wasn't legitimate:

The Sender

First, I looked at the sender information.:

What's In A Name?
The sender name of the message was "service@paypal.com."

Here's the deal with email sender names: they can easily be set to anything.

Usually, the name is just that; the name of the person who owns the account. But, as you can see, it's easy to set the name to "Joe Schmoe", "Coca-Cola, Inc.", "Help@BankOfAmerica.com" or "Fiona Feline" (Fiona is my 16-year-old cat; she's awesome).

These guys set the name to "service@paypal.com", hoping that I wouldn't notice the actual email address the message came from.

The Email Address Domain
What I look at next is the sender's email address domain. The above message came from "nonkfqvy1w39ta...@khahlgrg-962123312.net".

The part of an email address after the @ sign is the domain. This is usually the company name, or something like "@gmail.com."

If I were hearing from PayPal, I would expect the domain of the address to be "@PayPal.com."

So unless PayPal is changing their name to "khahlgrg-962123312" and I didn't get the memo, this message didn't come from them.

Link URL's

The message instructed me to click a button and "Log in to PayPal" to clear things up with my "restricted" account

Before following any link in an email message, I check the URL; the internet address the link opens.

  • Move the mouse over the link WITHOUT clicking.
  • If you are using web mail (viewing email in your browser at gmail.com, yahoo.com, etc), the URL appears at lower left of the browser window.
  • With mail applications like Mac Mail, Outlook, or Windows Mail, the URL display varies.

In Windows Mail, the URL appears in a box over the link:

URL Domain

Again, what I'm examining is the domain of the URL. This appears in the 2nd section of a link: after "http://" and before the next slash or question mark, ignoring the "www" if present.

As an example, these URL's all have a domain of houstonla.com:

  • https://www.houstonla.com/tips
  • https://www.houstonla.com?pay=1&r=v1297
  • http://houstonla.com/services
  • http://houstonla.com/services?userid=bogusemail

This message's domain is mysp.ac, not "PayPal.com" as one would expect. If these guys had been a touch smarter they might have procured a domain like PaiPal.com or something that at least came close to the company they're pretending to be. They get no points for ingenuity.

What To Do

In this case, I reported the message as spam and blocked the sender. Then, I opened my browser and went to PayPal.com. I logged into my account and checked notifications to ensure everything was in working order. As expected, all was well.

So now you know how to spot a phishing email message. I apologize if I was a bit wordy and/or over-explained things here; I tend to do that when I get going.

As always, contact me with any questions. I look forward to hearing from you!

Free Cloud Backup With Google™ Drive

6/15/2020

One of my clients is home user. She uses her computer to play Mahjong, shop on Amazon, and keep in touch with her 8 grandchildren who are spread throughout the country.

She keeps photos and videos of the family on her system. Obviously, they're of great value to her so we wanted to make sure they wouldn't get lost in the event of a system disaster.

That being said, she lives on a fixed income and every cent counts. Spending $24/month for Carbonite or another online backup service seemed exorbitant.

Fortunately, GMail offers a free solution with Google Drive and Google Backup & Sync.

Google™ Drive

Most of know that you can get a free email account with Google's GMail. Fewer of us know that the personal GMail accounts include 15 GB of free Google Drive cloud storage.

For reference, 15 GB (or gigabytes) will hold about 5,000 high-quality pictures.

This was perfect for my client. Her files, pictures, and videos amounted to less than 1 GB of disk space. Additionally, she was already a GMail user.

Google™ Backup & Sync

Google also offers a free program called Backup & Sync. The application is installed on your PC or Mac and it automatically backs up your computer to your Google Drive storage.

Here's how to set it all up:

Before You Begin

As I said, Drive offers 15 GB of storage. If you have more than 15 GB of files, videos, photos, and music on your computer, this solution isn't right for you.

Mac Users

If you're a Mac user, be aware that Apple gives you 5 GB of storage on ICloud for free. It's very likely that ICloud backup is already taking care of you. Read more at here.

Check Your Sytem Storage

Make sure that you're using less than 15 GB of storage for your files. For PC, here's how:

Click the Windows Start button (at lower left of your screen). Type "File Explorer" on the keyboard. Click on the File Explorer Application in search results to open it.

When File Explorer opens, click "This PC" in the left column. Your "main folders" will appear in the right pane (Desktop, Documents, Music, Picures, and Videos).

We want to check the size of each folder. For each one:

  • Move your mouse over the folder.
  • Click the RIGHTt mouse button to display the alternate menu.
  • Click on Properties.

Make a note of the folder size. In the example above, you'll see that I have 1.56 GB of pictures. If the size is MB or KB (ex: 550 MB), count the folder as 1 GB (it less than that but we'll use 1 to make things easy).

Do this for each of these folders:

  • Desktop
  • Documents
  • Music
  • Pictures
  • Videos

Total the size of all folders. This is how much storage space you'll need for system backup.

More Than 15 GB?
If your files exceed 15GB, Google Drive won't work. There IS an option to purchase more space for your account but then, well, it's not free. See prices for storage here.

Sign Up For GMail

If you already have a GMail account, ignore this section.

You can sign up for GMail for free. Know that you can just use the Google Drive storage for your account. You don't need to change your email address and notify all of your friends and family. You don't need to use the GMail email at all if you don't want to. You can just use the email and password to access your Drive backup storage.

Create your account at https://gmail.com/. REMEMBER THE PASSWORD you create for your account. We'll need your GMail address and password later.

Download And Install Backup & Sync

Install the Backup & Sync program on your computer:

  • Click this link
  • Scroll down to the Backup and Sync For Individuals.
  • Click the Download link.
  • Double-click the downloaded file to run the installer.
  • When the installer finishes, the Backup & Sync program opens. Click Get Started.
  • Sign in with your Gmail address and password.
  • In the My Computer section, your Desktop, Documents, and Pictures folders should be checked.
  • Click the "Choose Folder" link below the list. Select your Videos folder and click "Select Folder" to add this folder to your backup.
  • Click Next
  • In the Google Drive section, you can uncheck "Sync My Drive to this computer." If you are an active Drive user, you may want to leave this checked; use the Learn More link for help.
  • Click Start

First Backup

When Backup & Sync first starts, it will need to do an initial synchronization by uploading all of your files. This can take some time depending on how many files you have and the speed your internet connection.

At any time, check your backup status by clicking the cloud icon in your system tray (where your clock is displayed at lower right of your screen; the image below shows 30 GB of available space; yours will say 15 GB - I upgraded my account).

After initial backup, the program will automatically upload files whenever they change. See Google help for more information.